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ECONEX THAUMETOPOEA PITYOCAMPA 60 DAYS View larger

ECONEX THAUMETOPOEA PITYOCAMPA 60 DAYS

VA153

Sexual pheromone diffuser of the species Thaumetopoea pityocampa to attract males, with a duration of 60 days in normal field conditions...

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2,63 € tax excl.

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Data sheet

Target pest Pine processionary moth
Duration 60 days

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Sexual pheromone diffuser of the species Thaumetopoea pityocampa to attract males, with a duration of 60 days in normal field conditions.

Diffuser of natural rubber in capsule-shape. It is packaged individually in an aluminium sachet with labelled instructions. Once taken out of the sachet, the diffuser does not need any activation operation. Simply place it directly in the trap.

The processionary moth is a defoliating insect that feeds on all species of pine trees and cedars.

MORPHOLOGY AND BIOLOGY

When the pine processionary is in the moth/butterfly stage, the wingspan in females can reach between 36-49 mm.  The forewings are an ash-grey colour with darker veins and margins and three transverse bands.  The hindwings are white with grey fringes and a characteristic grey-brown spot in the anal region.  They have greyish hairs covering the thorax.  The abdomen is cylindrical, stout and its last segments are covered with a tuft of large scales.

The adult males have a wingspan between 31-39 mm and have lots of hairs on the thorax.  The abdomen is also very hairy, conical and slightly thinner than the females.

The hindwings are the same as the females, whereas the forewings are a grey colour varying in intensity and in this case, the three transverse bands are much darker and more visible than the females.

Depending on the weather between June and September, the pine processionary moth lays the eggs on the pine needles.  The number of eggs laid varies between 120 and 300. They are protected by the scales of the abdomen, making it look like a cigarette that covers the needles.

After a month, the caterpillars are born and gather together in their characteristic nests. In winter, at sunset the caterpillars enter into frenetic activity and start to travel in a line in search of food.

When they have finished feeding or when it is quite cold at night, the caterpillars return to the nest.

At the end of winter, they climb down to bury themselves in the ground with the aim of turning into moths, forming the procession lines which give them their name.  In the middle or at the end of summer the moth emerges and after mating, produces newly laid eggs.

The caterpillars take 30 to 40 days to be born and immediately after hatching they start to feed in the same place where they emerged from.

 

DETECTION AND MONITORING

A minimum of 1 ECONEX G TRAP should be placed per plot and up to 1 trap per 9 hectares. The traps should be hung from the pine trees or on a support for this purpose.

 

EXHAUSTIVE MONITORING

For exhaustive monitoring the number of traps per surface is increased, according to the location and uniformity of the plots.  One trap controls a surface area of up to 2,500 m².

This results in a density of 3 traps per hectare. On small plots the number of traps should be greatly increased. 

 

NECESSARY MATERIAL

We need an ECONEX G TRAP and an ECONEX THAUMETOPOEA PITYOCAMPA 60 DAYS pheromone diffuser. On the inside of the trap the pheromone diffuser is hung from the stopper cap, which is located in the upper part of the trap, using a paper clip.

SYMPTOMS AND DAMAGES

The pine processionary moth produces two types of damage: the first, affecting the plants and causing the loss of pine needles. This is because the caterpillars feed on the pine and cedar needles in winter.

The most significant damage is created from the end of winter to the middle of spring, when the caterpillars are bigger and more voracious.

The larvae from the 3rd to the 5th stage are strongly allergenic. They can even produce severe allergic reactions in people and animals.

 

PERIOD OF USE

In general, the flight of the adult pine processionary moth takes place between the months of June and September. In spring, observation traps should be placed using 1 or 2 per plot to detect the plague and observe its population levels.

Through tolerance thresholds established in each area, the moment to adopt control measures is later defined.

 

FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE THE NUMBER OF TRAPS NEEDED

The plague population, the connection to other pine trees, the level of control needed, etc. An important factor is the size of the pine forest. A larger amount of traps are needed in smaller and irregular forests than on plots with a larger and more uniform surface area.

In this case, the borders around the plots have to be reinforced. It may be necessary to place up to 3 traps per hectare for intensive monitoring purposes.

 

STORAGE OF THE DIFFUSERS

The diffusers must be kept in their original container and in a refrigerator at 4oC, or in the freezer at -18oC, in which case they will remain valid for 2 and 4 years respectively.

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